Targeted Calls for Research & Special Initiatives

A Targeted Call for Research (TCR) or Special Initiative is often a one-time solicitation for grant applications to address a specific health issues that will stimulate or greatly advance research in a particular area of health and medical science that will benefit the health of Australians.

OPEN Targeted Calls

2019 MRFF – Rare Cancers, Rare Diseases and Unmet Need

Key Dates:

Monday 25 June 2018 – Application Open in RGMS
Monday 30 July 2018 – Applications seeking internal review should be emailed to RIC nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au
Wednesday 1 August 2018 – NHMRC Minimum Data deadline. Applications not completing minimum data will not be allowed to proceed further.
10am AEST Monday 13 August 2018 – Final submissions due to RIC. CIA to submit a fully completed UoM Authority to Submit Form to RIC and certify the application in RGMS.

Submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) – The NOI should be completed early and provided to RIC with CIA contact details.

Funding Documents – The CI should read the NHMRC - MRFF RCRDUN Grant Guidelines and Category Descriptors respectively. These documents can be found on the Grant Connect website GO ID GO1375.

Please note: Our advice from NHMRC/MRFF, infers that “unmet need” includes any health condition with limited effective treatment options. Rare cancers and rare diseases are specific, life threatening or chronically debilitating health conditions that affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people in the population.

Overview:
The Australian Government has announced a total of up to $33 million from the MRFF for this grant opportunity. It is anticipated that up to twenty grants of up to five years duration will be considered with funding anticipated to commence in January 2019. This competitive grant opportunity will provide support for publicly funded clinical trials that address areas of health burden and unmet need, such as rare cancers and rare diseases. Applications to this grant opportunity must propose a clinical trial that addresses an ‘unmet medical need’ by improving the health outcomes for members of the Australian community living with serious health conditions whose diagnosis or treatment is not adequately addressed by existing options. The grant opportunity incorporates a call for applications to the Australian Brain Cancer Mission.

Rare cancers and rare diseases are specific, life threatening or chronically debilitating health conditions that affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people in the population1. There are limited effective treatment options for many rare cancers and diseases, and the combined health burden is significant. The grant opportunity aims to increase clinical trial activity in Australia by supporting new, high quality research. Novel and innovative clinical trial methodologies are encouraged, such as the application of precision medicine to take individual genetic variation into account in disease treatment. Applications proposing participation in international multi-centre clinical trials or utilising the capabilities of established clinical quality registries are also encouraged.

Brain cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer burden and brain cancers carry high rates of morbidity and mortality. The young are disproportionately affected by brain cancer, being the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for those under 25 years of age. The objective of this grant opportunity through the Mission is to support increased and equitable access and participation in clinical trials for people with brain cancer. Specifically through this funding, the Australian Brain Cancer Mission is seeking to fund new or expanded innovative clinical trials in brain cancer that could involve international collaborations.
The clinical trials should:
*be for children, adolescents and young adults, or adults with malignant brain cancer* and
*support increased and equitable access and participation.
The clinical trials may be in areas of:
*Diagnosis
*Treatment - Discovery and Development, or Clinical Application of Localized Therapies, Systemic Therapies, or Combinations of Localised and Systemic Therapies, including the assessment of new biological end points.
*Cancer Control, Survivorship & Outcomes - Patient Care, Survivorship, or End-of-Life Care

Contact: Ken Choong, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 9035 8763

2018 NHMRC – HEALTHY AGEING OF ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE

Key Dates:
*Wednesday 20 June 2018 – Applications Open in RGMS
*Wednesday 15 August 2018 – NHMRC Minimum Data deadline. Applications not completing minimum data will not be allowed to proceed further.
*Monday 20 August 2018 – Applications seeking internal review should be emailed to RIC nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au
*10am AEDT Monday 10 September 2018 – Final submissions due to RIC. CIA to submit aa fully completed UoM Authority to Submit Form to RIC and certify the application in RGMS.

Submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) – The NOI should be completed early and provided to RIC with CIA contact details.

Funding Documents – The CI should read the NHMRC All Schemes Funding Rules, Scheme Specific Funding Rules and Call-Specific Funding Rules,  as well as All Schemes Advice and Instructions to Applicants and the Scheme Specific Advice and Instructions to Applicants. Applicants must also read the Guide to Peer Review. These documents can be found on the Grant Connect website GO ID GO1358.

This Targeted Call for Research (TCR) focuses on the health and experiences of healthy ageing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples aspire to be ‘able to live out their lives as active, healthy, culturally secure and comfortably as possible’ by developing and maintaining their, physical, mental, social and cultural wellbeing.  
While the United Nations defines an ‘older’ person as someone who is older than 60, it has been suggested that 50 may be more appropriate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as they currently have poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians. They are more likely to live with chronic and complex conditions that lead to a poorer quality of life and are more likely to die at a younger age.

This TCR aims to support research that addresses the following research question: Identify novel and culturally-informed approaches to improve the health and ageing experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Specifically, the scope of this TCR is research into:
*Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander definitions and concepts of healthy ageing;
*Evidence-based, culturally appropriate and best practice health services and pathways to optimise ageing, including lifestyle factors, community development and life-course events such as maternity, upbringing and education;
*Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s indicators for health and well-being in older age. Factors that impact on their ageing could include geography, language, culture, mental health and social and emotions wellbeing, health literacy, chronic disease, childhood adversity and trauma, removal and social exclusion, social economic status and attitudinal change in lifespan (such as racism, ageism and sexism).

As previous TCRs have focused on research into Dementia in Indigenous Australians and Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples from Early Lift to Young Adults (outcomes to be announced in 2018), research projects exclusively focused on these topics will not be supported under this call. Research projects that include aspects of these topics but do not focus on them exclusively are acceptable.

The objectives of this TCR are, for older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, to identify novel and culturally sensitive approaches and initiatives to:
*Reduce the burden of chronic disease, including ‘geriatric’ conditions of ageing, and close the gap in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy.
*Incorporate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ concept of health and well-being, looking at the life-course and the impact of trauma.
*Increase responsiveness and cultural appropriateness of mainstream, community-controlled health and support services, individually and as a system, to address cultural needs of this ageing population.
*Research culturally appropriate health and support services that support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to remain on or return to country. Elders and other senior community members should be engaged as key stakeholders to champion culturally appropriate choices and approaches to health and wellbeing.
*Address the role of urbanisation and ageing. The majority of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population live in urban areas and are overrepresented in poor health statistics. The urban Indigenous population is growing, as are its health and wellbeing needs.
To address the aims and objectives of this TCR, applicants should provide a research proposal including details on:
*The research design, including a description of the population, study design, methods for recruiting participants, intervention to be used, what the comparison will be, what outcomes will be measured and how this will occur, statistical rigour and reproducibility of the study
*How the research aligns with the scope, objectives and expected outcomes of the call
*The relevant experience and expertise of the research team
*A description of the disciplines, sectors and policy and practice partners that will be involved in the research and the contributions of each of these
*How the research will address the social determinants of health, where appropriate
*How the research findings would be translated into changes in policy, and/or used to develop new health services or programmes.

As part of this call, NHMRC is encouraging applications that address Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health, and in particular applications that involve collaborations between groups in Australia, New Zealand and Canada (as all three countries have signed a Tripartite Agreement on International Indigenous Health Research).’

Qualifying applications must address the NHMRC Indigenous Research Excellence Criteria (see section 6.3 of the 2018 NHMRC Funding Rules). This includes:
*Ensuring community engagement that shows how research and potential outcomes are a priority for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
*Demonstrating the potential health benefit of the project by addressing an important public health issue for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
*Demonstrating how the results of the project have the potential to lead to achievable and effective contributions to health gain for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, beyond the life of the project.
*Demonstrating how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and researchers will develop relevant capabilities through partnerships and participation in the project.
The total available budget is AUD$5 million has been allocated to support a number of research projects identified via this call. Funding will be provided to the top ranked applications until the allocated funding is expended. The number of projects funded is therefore dependent on the size of the grants. Funding will be available over the period of 5 years, unless applications specify a shorter period.

Contact: Anne Coco, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 8344 8265

2018 NHMRC-GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR CHRONIC DISEASES (GACD) GRANTS

Key dates

  • Wednesday 9 May 2018 – Applications Open in RGMS
  • Wednesday 20 June 2018 5pm AEDT - NHMRC Minimum Data deadline. Applications not completing minimum data will not be allowed to proceed further.
  • Wednesday 18 July 2018 - Applications seeking internal review should be emailed to RIC nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au
  • 10am AEDT Monday 13 August – Final submissions due to RIC.  CIA to submit a fully completed UOM Authority to Submit form to RIC and certify the application in RGMS.

Submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) - The NOI should be completed early to provide RIC with CIA contact details.

Funding documents - The CI should read the NHMRC All Schemes Funding Rules and Scheme Specific Funding Rules, as well as All schemes Advice and Instructions to Applicants and the Scheme Specific Advice and Instructions to Applicants. Applicants must also read the Guide to Peer Review. These documents can be found on the Grant Connect website GO ID GO1224

Together with other GACD member agencies, NHMRC is inviting investigators to submit applications for research associated with the scale-up of interventions for the prevention, or detection and management of hypertension and/or diabetes in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) and/or in vulnerable communities in high income countries (HIC).

NHMRC will support projects directly aligned with the scope of the GACD call: Scaling-up of evidence-based interventions at the population level for the prevention or management of hypertension and/or diabetes. The research must be conducted in LMIC and/or with Indigenous populations in HIC. Applications that involve collaborations between Indigenous groups in Australia and Canada are encouraged along with New Zealand, they have recently renewed the Agreement on improving the health and wellness of Indigenous people in these countries.

Proposals must focus on scalable interventions at the population level for hypertension and/or diabetes prevention or detection and management in LMIC, and/or in vulnerable populations in HIC. Proposals addressing the concurrence of hypertension and diabetes are encouraged as well as those addressing the underlying risk factors of both conditions.

Proposals must build on evidence-based interventions (including evidence of cost-effectiveness and affordability) for the respective population groups under defined contextual circumstances and should seek to replicate and scale-up comprehensive interventions.

The overall intention of proposals is to enhance the scale-up of interventions using an implementation science approach. Implementation science examines what works, for whom and under what circumstances, and how interventions can be adapted and scaled up in ways that are accessible and equitable (please see the GACD website for further information and resources on implementation science).To achieve this, the research should cover several of the following:
*Identify the best evidence-based interventions and their potential for adaptation to the communities and contexts in which they will be implemented;
*Identify, develop, test, and evaluate, or refine known strategies to scale-up evidence-based practices8 into public health, clinical practice, and/or community settings at a regional or national level. They may include pilots in multiple settings (using a defined scalable unit), in order to identify optimal scale-up approaches;
*Identify, understand, and develop strategies for overcoming barriers to the adoption, adaptation, integration, scale-up and sustainability of evidence-based interventions across different communities and contexts. It should address a range of scale-up challenges, including complex processes, inefficient use of resources, inequitable allocation of resources, poor design, fidelity and uptake of the intervention, and supply and demand barriers to scale-up and sustainability;
*Identify, understand, and develop strategies for measuring the unintended consequences of intervening at a system level;
*Include assessments of accessibility, reach and health economic assessments as an integral part of the proposed research;
*Evaluate relevant and measurable outcomes (including health outcomes) of the implemented interventions, and their success in scale-up and sustainability. This includes measures of health equity and an understanding of how interventions impact populations differentially.

All proposals should:
*be multidisciplinary and cross-sectorial;
*take into consideration relevant sex and gender and cultural aspects, as well as vulnerable populations;
*promote a culture of evidence-informed learning and effective uptake of results by embedding real time monitoring/evaluation throughout the intervention selection and scale-up process;
*incorporate considerations for capacity building for implementation science and knowledge translation, particularly within the countries where the research will be conducted
*have suitable governance structures in place to ensure oversight, consensus and appropriate engagement of relevant stakeholders throughout the projects
*fully consider ethical issues (e.g., related to research with populations in vulnerable circumstances; potential harmful or inequitable impacts of research outcomes; and appropriate mechanisms for protection of sensitive data while enabling data sharing for research purposes)
*ensure conflicts of interest are appropriately minimized or managed to protect the scientific integrity and credibility of the research and fulfil ethical obligations to research participants, particularly in situations where interventions are supported by the private sector and/or there is the potential for commercial gains.

The total available budget is AUD$4.9 million and grant of up to 5 years will be considered. In 2017, a similar amount was distributed across four awards.

Grant Guidelines and information on how to apply is available via Grant Connect (GO ID GO839) and NHMRC website. Applicants should also refer to the GACD website.

Contact: Anne Coco, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 8344 8265

2018 NHMRC TARGETED CALL FOR RESEARCH
INTO DEBILITATING SYMPTOM COMPLEXES ATTRIBUTED TO TICKS

Key dates

  • Wednesday 30 May 2018 – Applications Open in RGMS
  • Monday 11 July 2018 5pm AEDT - NHMRC Minimum Data deadline. Applications not completing minimum data will not be allowed to proceed further.
  • Monday 2 July 2018 - Applications seeking internal review should be emailed to RIC nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au
  • 10am AEDT Monday 23 July – Final submissions due to RIC.  CIA to submit a fully completed UOM Authority to Submit form to RIC and certify the application in RGMS.

Submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) - The NOI should be completed early to provide RIC with CIA contact details.
Funding documents - The CI should read the NHMRC All Schemes Funding Rules, Scheme Specific Funding Rules and Call Specific Funding Rules as well as All schemes Advice and Instructions to Applicants and the Scheme Specific Advice and Instructions to Applicants. Applicants must also read the Guide to Peer Review. These documents can be found on the Grant Connect website GO1293

This TCR aims to support research that addresses the following question:

* What is the epidemiology of DSCATT and how can it be effectively diagnosed, managed and treated?

NHMRC is keen to see collaborative and multidisciplinary research to avoid duplication of effort and to develop synergies between researchers and clinicians looking at different aspects of causes, diagnosis, symptom management and treatment.

Areas of research may include:

* epidemiological studies of patients presenting with DSCATT, including
– developing and validating clinical case definitions
– determining the incidence, prevalence and geographical distribution of DSCATT, including correlation to potential vectors, where relevant
– determining physical, psychological and social impacts of DSCATT on patients.

* clinical studies to:
– establish clear and consistent clinical case definitions of DSCATT; this may require clinical studies of cases to describe the natural history of the illness and define the spectrum of symptoms
– determine the causes and describe the pathophysiology of DSCATT
– identify and assess the effectiveness of diagnostics
– identify and assess the effectiveness of existing or new treatments and approaches to symptom management.
This call for research does not support:
* Sociological research into attitudes of health service providers or perceived discrimination.
* Research focussed exclusively on the detection of potential pathogens in ticks or non-human hosts.
* Research focussed exclusively on Borrelia burgdorferi.
* Research based entirely overseas (out of Australia).

Contact: Anne Coco, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 8344 8265


Closed Targeted Calls

CLOSED: Low Survival Cancers and Diseases (LSCD) Grant Opportunity

Please see the Closed Funding Opportunities on the RIC MRFF website.

CLOSED: NHMRC-NAFOSTED Joint Call for Collaborative Research Projects

CLOSED: Applications closed 14 March 2018. Outcomes are expected in September/October 2018.

NHMRC and the National Foundation for Science and Technology Development of Vietnam (NAFOSTED) have together developed this call to support joint collaborative research projects in the field of infectious diseases, maternal or child health and public health.

The specific objectives of this joint grant opportunity are to:

  • generate new knowledge in infectious diseases, maternal/child health and/or public health that can be translated into health policy and practice to benefit human health
  • foster co-investment with international partners in research programs of joint interest that will involve researchers based in Vietnam and Australia
  • foster the exchange of scientific skills and technological capabilities between Vietnam and Australia, and
  • build further collaborations between Vietnamese and Australian researchers.

Proposals must involve at least one research team from both Vietnam and Australia and the Vietnamese CI must complete all application requirements in NAFOSTED’s online management system (OMS).The total available budget is AUD$6 million to distribute eight grants. NHMRC grants are worth up to AUD $500,000 each for up to three years and NAFOSTED will also set budget limits.

Grant Guidelines and information on how to apply is available via Grant Connect (GO ID GO839) and NHMRC website. Applicants should also refer to the NAFOSTED website.

Contact: nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au


CLOSED: Research into Social and Emotional Wellbeing and Mental Health for ATSI People from Early Life to Young Adults

CLOSED: Applications closed 7 February 2018.

This TCR aims to provide funding for rigorous, culturally-informed research into maintaining and improving the SEWB and mental health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander(ATSI) infants, children, adolescents and young adults, and fostering wellness.

As previous NHMRC TCRs have focused on Indigenous youth suicide prevention, and dementia for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, research projects exclusively focused on these topics will not be supported under this call. Research projects that include aspects of these topics but do not focus on them exclusively are acceptable.

Grant Guidelines and information on how to apply is available via Grant Connect (GO ID GO750).

Contact: ric-majorinitiatives@unimelb.edu.au


CLOSED: Boosting Dementia Research Grants - National Dementia Network (Round 3)

CLOSED: Applications closed 8 November 2017. Outcomes are expected May 2018.

NHMRC has allocated funding to support a multidisciplinary, national team to establish and maintain a National Dementia Network under PR3. The objective of the Network is to improve the lives of people with dementia, as well as accelerating translation of interventions to treat and prevent dementia beginning with establishing and maintaining a national dementia registry as a national resource. Up to $18 million will be provided by NHMRC to support a National Dementia Network via PR3. Funding is available over five years.
Information about the scheme can be found on NHMRC webpage. Applicants must refer to NHMRC Funding Rules and NHMRC Advice and Instructions as well as NHMRC Scheme Specific Advice and Instructions the NHMRC scheme specific Funding Rules, Peer Review Guidelines and Grant Proposal template to be downloaded via Grant Connect (GO ID: GO498) (link is external and requires log in)

Notice of Intent: It is mandatory to submit a UOM Notice of Intent for NHMRC schemes and this should be done ASAP to ensure you receive communications / updates during the round. This must be done by the following NOI link

Authority to Submit Form: Mandatory - Submit with your final application to RIC

Contact: Anna Giannios, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au


CLOSED: Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) Antimicrobial Resistance Targeted Call for Research (AMR-TCR)

Important Dates:

CLOSED: Applications closed 4 October 2017. Outcomes are expected in December 2017.

This competitive grant opportunity aims to stimulate research on novel and innovative methodologies, such as genomics, to determine antimicrobial resistance profiles and transmission within, to and from residential aged care facilities. This knowledge will assist in the promotion and development of optimal and appropriate antimicrobial use in residential aged care facilities. Grant Guidelines and information on how to apply is available via Grant Connect (GO ID: GO417).

Contact: Sophie Cleaves, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 9035 4878


CLOSED: Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) Lifting Clinical Trials and Registries Capacity (LCTRC) Grant Opportunity

CLOSED: Applications closed 4 October 2017. Outcomes are expected in December 2017.

This competitive grant opportunity will stimulate clinical trial and registry activity with priority to be given to under-researched health priorities, such as rare cancers and rare diseases. Novel and innovative trial designs and recruitment strategies and the application of precision medicine will also be encouraged under this grant opportunity. Grant Guidelines and information on how to apply is available via Grant Connect (GO ID: GO440)

Contact: Sophie Cleaves, nhmrc-project@unimelb.edu.au, 9035 4878


CLOSED: Targeted Call for Research into Dementia in Indigenous Australians

CLOSED: Applications closed 12 July 2017 and no further application rounds have been announced

This TCR aims to support culturally appropriate research aligned to at least one of the NNIDR’s five priority themes (prevention, assessment & diagnosis, intervention & treatment, living with dementia, care), which will directly improve the health of, and health care for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians at risk of developing or currently living with dementia, and their families and carers. As such, research proposals will be expected to have a strong translational focus.

A total of $10m has been allocated to support a small number of collaborative research team. Funding will be available for any period of up to five years over the period of 2018-2022.


CLOSED: Targeted Call for Research into depression, anxiety and suicide among elderly Australians

CLOSED: Applications closed 31 May 2017 and no further application rounds have been announced

This TCR aims to support research that addresses the question: How can the rates and impacts of depression, anxiety and suicide among elderly Australians living in the community and/or in residential aged care services be reduced?

Researchers may address this question with regard to prevention or detection and management, and may focus on depression, and/or anxiety and/or suicide. The research must include human participants aged 65 years and older. Particular emphasis should be given to those aged 75 years and older, including men aged 85+, who have disproportionately high rates of suicide.

A total of $5m has been allocated to support a small number of collaborative research team. Funding will be available for any period of up to five years over the period of 2018-2022.


CLOSED: Dementia Research Development Fellowships (NHMRC/ARC)

CLOSED: Applications closed 15 March 2015 and no further application rounds have been announced

Strategic, Urgent and Targeted Calls for Research. NHMRC and the Australian Research Council (ARC) have worked together to establish a new initiative to increase research capacity in dementia as part of the ‘Building the workforce’ element of the Boosting Dementia Research Initiative. Fellowships will be provided over four years and include a project component of up to $250,000, funded by the ARC, to support research costs.


CLOSED: Dementia Research Team Grants

CLOSED: Applications closed 8 October 2014 and no further application rounds have been announced

Strategic, Urgent and Targeted Calls for Research. Occasionally, the NHMRC may announce schemes to address particular health issues. The Dementia Research Team Grants Scheme is part of the Boosting Dementia Research Initiative. Dementia Research Team Grants will provide support for teams of researchers over five years to pursue collaborative research, promote effective translation of research, and develop capacity under a dementia research priority framework.