Nine mid-career Melbourne researchers named ‘Future Fellows’

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Nine University of Melbourne mid-career researchers have been awarded Australian Research Council Future Fellowships across areas including engineering, health and social sciences.

Future Fellows receive funding for four years, enabling them to progress innovative research with potential benefits for all Australians.

This year’s University of Melbourne ARC Future Fellows are:

  • Dr Joseph Berry, from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology (Unravelling how liquids wet surfaces with new dynamic measurements)
  • Dr Sebastian Duchene, from the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences (Data-driven phylodynamics: molecular evolution to epidemiology)
  • Associate Professor Zhe Liu, from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology (Physics-based equivalent circuit models for nanoporous electrodes)
  • Dr Anastasios Polyzos, from the Faculty of Science (Next Generation Photocatalysis for Chemical Synthesis and Manufacture)
  • Professor Leah Ruppanner, from the Faculty of Arts (The Consequences of the Mental Load for Australian Families)
  • Associate Professor Jason Thompson, from the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning (Improving the performance of Australian social insurance schemes)
  • Professor Adam Vogel, from the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences (Detecting and tracking alertness using speech biometrics)
  • Professor Margaret Young, from Melbourne Law School (The Blue Economy and International Law)
  • Associate Professor Andrew Zalesky, from the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences (Charting the human brain connectome over the lifespan).

See the full list of national recipients here.

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