Affiliated researchers

UOM Disability Researchers (39)

  1. Zoe Aitken

    Research Fellow

    Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, UoM


    Overview


    Zoe Aitken is a research fellow at the Gender and Women's Health Unit at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. She has been working at the University of Melbourne since 2011 to pursue her interest in social epidemiology and was awarded an NHMRC postdoctoral scholarship in April 2015. She has a particular interest in the analysis of longitudinal studies to answer causal questions about the complex interplay between socio-economic disadvantage and health.


    DRI Projects

    Experiences of discrimination and bullying against Australians with disabilities

  2. Larry Abel

    Lab Director

    Optometry and Vision Sciences, MDHS, UoM


    Overview


    DRI Projects

    Optimising visual attention in children with autism spectrum disorder Project was funded through the MNI interdisciplinary seed funding 2016 round, supported by DRI

  3. Karen Block

    Research Fellow

    Centre for Health Equity, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Karen Block is a Research Fellow within the Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Team in the Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. Karen has an interest in qualitative methodologies, mixed methods research and research ethics. She is currently working on a range of projects involving children and young people with a focus on social inclusion, health inequalities, evaluating complex interventions and working in collaborative partnerships with the community. She is an active member of a number of interdisciplinary groups including Researchers for Asylum Seekers (RAS) and the Melbourne Refugee Studies Program. Her recently completed doctoral project, Refugee Youth, Social Inclusion and Health, aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the issues impacting on social inclusion for newly-arrived adolescent and young adult refugees in Australia and to inform policy and program development relating to service provision for this population and was supported by a NHMRC postgraduate scholarship and a Sidney Myer Health Scholarship. Building on this, current projects focus on refugee background young people and families in a range of Australian settings. She is also a member of the Beyond Bushfires research team, engaged in a study of the medium to long term impacts on communities of the February 2009 'Black Saturday' bushfires in Victoria.


    DRI Projects

    Listening for (a) change Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

  4. Lisa Brophy

    Senior Research Fellow

    Centre for Mental Health, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Lisa has a career-long commitment to the mental health field of practice. As Director of Research at Mind Australia, Lisa has developed and is implementing Mind’s Research and Evaluation Framework, which is focused on recovery and social inclusion. Lisa’s current research interests include the implications of the shift to individualised funding for people with psychosocial disability and efforts to reduce coercion and restrictive practice. She is also actively leading program evaluation and outcome measurement projects.


    DRI Projects

    Empathy and portrayals of mental illness in Australian visual culture

  5. Barbara Creed

    Professor of Cinema Studies

    School of Culture and Communication, Arts, UoM


    Overview


    Barbara is a Professor of Cinema Studies known for her cultural criticism. Her areas of research include feminist film theory, film and psychoanalytic theory, the impact of Darwinian theory on the cinema, and the cinema of human rights and human-animal studies. Her seminal work, The Monstrous-Feminine: Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 1993), is now in its sixth edition. Barbara is a member of the Australian Academy of the Humanities and an active figure in the film community as a film reviewer, speaker and writer. She is the recipient/co-recipient of five Australian Research Council Discovery grants. In 2011, Barbara established the Human Rights & Animal Ethics Research Network (HRAE).


    DRI Projects

    Empathy and portrayals of mental illness in Australian visual culture

  6. Matthew Delbridge

    Head of Theatre

    Victorian College of the Arts, UoM


    Overview


    Matt Delbridge is Head of Theatre at the Victorian College of the Arts. Before joining Melbourne he held positions at the University of Tasmania, Queensland University of Technology, Queen Mary University of London, and Deakin University. His research areas include: actor training, motion capture, performance technologies, animation, theatre history, cultural heritage, scenography, technology studies and production processes. Matt's work has been published in SCENE, Animation Practice, Process and Production, Body Space, Technology and Nordic Theatre Studies. He regularly designs for Split Britches (US/UK), consults and delivers masterclasses in Motion Capture and Digital Performance environments in Scandinavia, Europe and Asia, and is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Creative Media, City University Hong Kong. His book Motion Capture in Performance: An Introduction (Palgrave Macmillan) was released in 2015 http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137505804. Forthcoming: Theatre & Technology (Palgrave Macmillan) 2017; Performing Landscapes: Ice co edited with Leane, E and Philpott, C (Palgrave Macmillan) 2018. Matt also provides regular public commentary on issues related to Acting in Motion Capture and Visual Effect in Contemporary Film. Latest article here: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/motion-capture-performances-andy-serkis-oscars-animated-films-a7370331.html


    DRI Projects

    Women and disability: Stand-up comedy as a tool for advocacy

  7. Alex Devine

    Senior Research Officer

    Nossal Institute for Global Health, MDHS, UoM


    Overview


    Alexandra Devine is a Senior Research Officer with a focus on disability inclusive development. Alex has been a co-investigator on two Australian development Research Awards. The first focused on the development of the Rapid Assessment of Disability. The second, the W-DARE project was a three year participatory action research project which aimed to improve access to quality sexual and reproductive health, including protection from violence, for women and girls with disability in Philippines. Alex has led and supported a number of research activities for the CBM-Nossal Partnership including an evaluation of sport for inclusive development programs in the Pacific; a UNICEF situation analysis of children with disability in Cambodia; and analysis of the inclusion of people with psychosocial disability in development cooperation. Prior to this, Alex was involved in a number of projects in the Northeast of India, exploring mental health promotion as a mechanism to reduce the risk of HIV transmission for widows or injecting drug users; and, a research project exploring pathways to sex-work in Nagaland. Alex sits on the Executive Committee for the Australian Disability and Development Consortium, and is the coordinator of Nossal’s Disability and International Development subject.


    DRI Projects

    Ethical fashion and preventing violence in Bangladesh Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

    More than the sum of my parts

  8. Kristin Diemer

    Senior Research Fellow

    Department of Social Work, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Kristin Diemer is a sociologist with twenty years of research experience designing, implementing and managing both large and small scale projects. Her applied social research skills are particularly aimed toward research design, methodology and data analysis (mixed methods).  Her focus has been in the area of family and domestic violence applied research. Recent projects include mixed-methods data collection and analysis across both small case files and large hospital and governmental department databases recording family violence, sexual assault, homicide and child abuse incidents. In addition to research positions in both academia and across government, she teaches in the areas of social change and research methodology and also undertakes photo-documentary projects on social issues.


    DRI Projects

    More than the sum of my parts

  9. Jane Dyson

    Lecturer

    School of Geography, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Jane Dyson has worked for thirteen years in the high Himlayas in India examining gender, work, and social transformation from the perspective of social geography, cultural anthropology and development studies. She received her doctorate from the University of Cambridge (2006) before teaching at the University of Washington and at the University of Oxford, where she also worked as Research Associate at the School of Geography and the Environment on three projects related to youth and gender in India and the UK. Jane's doctoral work explored children’s everyday work relations in Uttarakhand, India and is presented in her book, Working Childhoods (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Drawing on eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork (2002-2004), conducted in Hindi and Garhwali, Jane's research used an understanding of children's everyday work practices to develop a feminist approach to agency, one that foregrounds quiescence and the cultivation of social relationships as a basis for achieving a measure of personal power. She also explored to the ways in which young people interact creatively with their environments, examining the role of improvisation and questions of space. Since 2011, Jane has worked in the same village as part of an ESRC funded project (at University of Oxford) examining the politics of educated, unemployed youth in South Asia. This includes collaborative work (with Craig Jeffrey) on two key themes: the role of an interstitial generation of youth in mediating social change, and investigating attitudes to and practices of education over the past decade. She is independently exploring how changing marriage practices can act as a lens through which to explore social change. As part of this project, Jane has made the documentary film, Lifelines, for which she was awarded an ESRC Award for International Impact, and an Oxford Teaching Excellence Award. The film has been screened at fifteen international film festivals, and along with its accompanying teaching resources, has been used in universities and secondary schools throughout the world. Jane regularly presents for BBC Radio 4. Jane's commitment to long-term ethnographic research is mirrored in her teaching. She won two Teaching Excellence Awards at the University of Oxford to design and teach an interdisciplinary postgraduate course titled 'Ethnographic Portraits', which draws heavily on her co-edited book Telling Young Lives: Portraits of Global Youth. She is also the co-editor (with Craig Jeffrey) for the Global Youth book series, with Temple University Press. Before beginning her work in India, Jane worked for several years on research and outreach projects in Zimbabwe, Senegal, Guinea and Ethiopia, on issues including local level natural resource management, human-wildlife conflict, young people, work and education.


    DRI Projects

    Social inclusion for young people affected by psychosocial disability in Uttarakhand, India

  10. Piers Gooding

    Post-doctoral Research Fellow

    Melbourne Law School, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Gooding is a socio-legal and policy researcher with a research background in law, history and political science. His research interests include disability justice in the broad sense of economic, social and political equity for people with disabilities. His work has a particular focus on legal capacity, decision-making, mental health policy, access to justice and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). Piers joined the Melbourne Law School and the Melbourne Social Equity Institute (MSEI) in September 2015 as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow. The research project focuses on unfitness to plead laws in the light of the UNCRPD and includes participatory action research to evaluate the effectiveness of support for accused persons with cognitive disabilities in Australia. The research has a particular focus on supporting Indigenous persons with cognitive disabilities.


    DRI Projects

    19 Stories of social inclusion: Lessons from the lives of everyday Australian on belonging, disability and community contribution

    More than the sum of my parts

    Unfitness to plead and indefinite detention of persons with cognitive impairments in Australia

  11. Nathan Grills

    Associate Professor

    Nossal Institute for Global Health, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Assoc.Professor Nathan Grills, a Public Health Physician and NHMRC post doctoral fellow, works largely in India on disability, non communicable diseases and health curriculum development and training. He has worked as a Public Health Fellow (Dept. of Health) and with CDC & WHO on HIV and civil society partnerships after completing his MPH and DPhil at Oxford University. He has international experience in Africa, Fiji, East Timor, PNG, Bangladesh and Nepal. He currently facilitates a Network of programs who work together to help train Community Health Workers to serve the under-served. He has faculty positions with Melbourne University, the Public Health Foundation of India, the Emmanuel Health Association (India)  and is the international coordinator for the Community Health Global Network.


    DRI Projects

    Social inclusion for young people affected by psychosocial disability in Uttarakhand, India

  12. Raymond Harbridge

    Research

    Centre for Workplace Leadership, FBE, UoM


    Overview
  13. Lucy Healey

    Senior Research Fellow

    Department of Social Work, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Lucy Healey is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Social Work at The University of Melbourne where she has undertaken social policy research and evaluation into violence against women and children, including women with disabilities, since 2007. She has over 25 years of research experience and expertise in qualitative methodologies, having previously taught anthropology and gender studies at Monash University and The University of Melbourne and managed research and evaluation projects for government and non-government organisations. Since 2006, her work has focussed exclusively on domestic and family violence with a special focus on gendered disability violence. She authored reports in the recent Voices Against Violence series, and was principal author of and researcher on Building the Evidence: a report on the status of police and practice in responding to violence against women with disabilities in Victoria , which led to the development of a transferrable tool designed to interrogate domestic violence sector professional standards and codes of practice for their attention to women with disabilities. Her other areas of research include the development of multi-agency partnerships and integrated systems, the long-term needs of women who have experienced violence, and rapid risk screening (triage) of family violence referrals.


    DRI Projects

    More than the sum of my parts

  14. Josh Healy

    Senior Research Fellow

    Centre for Workplace Leadership, FBE, UoM


    Overview


    Josh joined the Centre in April 2015 after 13 years at the National Institute of Labour Studies (NILS), Flinders University, where he was first a research associate, then a Ph.D. student, and eventually a postdoctoral research fellow. He retains adjunct status as a research fellow at NILS. Josh’s initial training was in the field of employment relations and his research is broadly focused on the links between employment regulation, workplace structures, and organisational performance. A major focus of his recent research has been the causes of rising earnings inequality, especially as this relates to low-wage work and the adjustment of minimum wages. His Ph.D. thesis, undertaken in a linkage partnership with the Australian Industrial Relations Commission, examined the operation and effects of Australian minimum wages in the period from 1993 to 2005. His recent publications include studies of gender wage inequality, the effects of skill shortages on firm performance, and several reviews of developments in the Australian labour market. Alongside his scholarly publications, Josh has contributed to or led many commissioned research projects, including for key Australian Government departments and agencies, employers, unions, and other leading research organisations, such as the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). His consultancy reports include studies of paid-care workforces in the aged, community and disability sectors, the settlement of new immigrants to Australia, health and safety in the natural resources industry, public sector productivity, and high-performance workplaces. His research has been reported in a variety of national media outlets including the ABC and Australian Financial Review. Much of Josh’s research experience has involved designing, administering and analysing survey data on Australian workers and workplaces. His previous studies of the aged and community care sectors have involved large, linked surveys of workplace managers and employees within these workplaces. He was involved in the early stages of the design and fieldwork management for a similar study of the disability sector workforce, being undertaken as part of the independent evaluation of the trial of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). Josh brings his rich experience in survey-based research to the Study of Australian Leadership (SAL) project at the Centre for Workplace Leadership.

    DRI Projects

    Recruitment and retention of people with disability

  15. Fincina Hopgood

    Research Fellow/Project Manager

    School of Culture and Communication, Arts, UoM


    Overview


    Fincina is an Associate Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE) and a Researcher affiliated with the Human Rights & Animal Ethics Research Network (HRAE). Fincina wrote her doctoral dissertation on representations of mental illness in Australian and New Zealand films of the 1990s. In 2014, she was co-convenor of the symposium Try Walking in My Shoes: Empathy and Portrayals of Mental Illness on Screen, presented by CHE in collaboration with The Dax Centre. Speakers included screen studies scholars, mental health professionals, documentary filmmakers and mental health consumers. The event received widespread media coverage in the press, on radio and online, and Fincina was subsequently invited to present her research in Sydney at a mental health forum and at the symposium The Ethics of Empathy, convened by CHE.


    DRI Projects

    Empathy and portrayals of mental illness in Australian visual culture

  16. Anne Kavanagh

    Head of Gender & Women's Health

    Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, UoM


    Overview

    Professor Anne Kavanagh is a medically trained epidemiologist who is well-known for her work on health inequalities and cancer screening programs. She is Director of the Gender and Women's Health Unit in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health.

    Her research on health inequalities focuses on the importance of gender and social and economic disadvantage in relation to a range of health behaviours such as physical activity and diet and outcomes including diabetes, heart disease and mental health and wellbeing. Her work concentrates on the effects a range of social determinants of health including disability, the built environment, and housing.

    Professor Kavanagh's research in relation to breast cancer screening includes the evaluation of Australia's mammographic screening programs in relation to quality and efficacy. She also conducts a range of projects on the effects of high breast density (a large proportion of breast glandular tissue) on the performance of mammographic screening programs.


    DRI Projects

    Experiences of discrimination and bullying against Australians with disabilities

  17. Michelle Kermode

    Head of Maternal and Reproductive Health

    Nossal Institute for Global Health, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview

    Michelle Kermode is a public health researcher with experience in the fields of HIV, sexual and reproductive health, mental health and women's health in low and middle-income countries. She has worked extensively with partners from India and more recently from Kenya. Michelle has collaborated with government agencies, non-government organisations, faith-based organisations, academic institutes and health facilities. She has skills in both quantitative and qualitative research methods and offers supervision to PhD candidates.


    DRI Projects

    Social inclusion for young people affected by psychosocial disability in Uttarakhand, India

  18. Rimi Khan

    Research Fellow

    School of Culture and Communication, Arts, UoM


    Overview


    DRI Projects

    Ethical fashion and preventing violence in Bangladesh Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

  19. Tania King

    Research Fellow

    Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, UoM


    Overview


    Tania King is a Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Her work broadly examines the social and structural determinants of health, with a particular interest in social and health inequalities. Her expertise encompasses aspects of inequalities such as housing affordability, employment, racism and discrimination, health promoting built environments and quantitative methods.


    DRI Projects

    Experiences of discrimination and bullying against Australians with disabilities

  20. Brian Kidd

    Senior Lecturer

    Department of Architecture and Building UoM


    Overview


    Brian is an architect who has specialised for over 50 years in designing for people with disabilities and people who are ageing.  He has been involved in the barrier free and universal design movement since 1962. Brian was Chairman of the ACROD National Committee on Access and Mobility from 1984-1994, and an ACROD representative on the Standards Association Committee MR/64, which drafted the AS1428-1988 Standards on Design for Access & Mobility. He was one of ACROD’s key representatives to introduce the relevant regulations for Access to Public Buildings in the Building Code of Australia. Brian is currently a member of ACAA. From 1997 until 2006, he worked in own right in association with Perth firm Kidd and Povey and redeveloped eight sites for the Brightwater Care Group, involving residential aged care facilities, a retirement community, and a residential care facility for people with Huntington’s Disease. Previously, from 1997 to 1990, Brian was Senior Lecturer in the Department of Architecture and Building at the University of Melbourne.


    DRI Projects

    Market forces or forcing markets

  21. Gubbi Lakshminarasimha

    Investigator

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering, MSE, UoM


    Overview
  22. Mary Luckhurst

    Professor of Artistic Research and Creative Practice

    Victorian College of the Arts, UoM


    Overview


    Mary Luckhurst is Professor of Artistic Research and Creative Practice in the faculty of VCA-MCM. She is a theatre director, writer, theatre historian and a pioneer of practice as research. She is a world expert on dramaturgy and on analyzing and articulating the applied processes writing, acting and directing in theatre-making. She is a specialist in modern drama and her many books include Dramaturgy: A Revolution in Theatre; On Acting; On Directing; Theatre and Celebrity, and Playing for Real, as well as two Blackwells Companions on British and Irish Theatre. She completed a BA Hons: Modern Languages at the University of Cambridge (1985) and then an MSc. European Politics at the London School of Economics (1986). She then worked in theatre for ten years after winning the Most Promising Playwright Award (Stratford East Theatre, London), working as a director, dramaturg and playwright and running her own theatre company. She gained her MA Performing Arts from Middlesex University (1997) and returned to the University of Cambridge to do her PhD (2000). Having been a key player in the initiation the BA and MA Writing and Performance within the English Department at the University of York (UK), she co-founded the innovative, industry-led research Department of Theatre, Film and Television there in 2007. She was made a National Teaching Fellow and one of only fourteen International Scholars by the UK Higher Education Academy in recognition of her outstanding contributions to research and practice in theatre. Her research expertise includes applied theories of acting and directing, theories of actor-training, performing real people, theatre and celebrity studies, political theatres, theatres of war and terror, practice as research, theatre and human rights, the Gothic and spectrality studies as it relates to theatre and dramatic literature, theatre and emotion. Her latest books include Theatre and Ghosts: Materiality, Performance and Modernity (Palgrave 2014). Her book on playwright Caryl Churchill is in press (Routledge, 2014/15). She is currently working on Theatre and Human Rights after 1945: Things Unspeakable (Palgrave 2015).


    DRI Projects

    Women and disability: Stand-up comedy as a tool for advocacy

  23. Yvette Maker

    Research Fellow

    Melbourne Law School, UoM


    Overview


    Yvette is a PhD researcher in the School of Social and Political Sciences, and the recipient of a STRAPA scholarship arising from the partnership between the University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Yvette's PhD research draws on both feminist and disability studies research to critically examine the implications of Australian income support policy, particularly Carer Payment (child), for carers and children with disability. Yvette is assisting Professor Theresia Degener, the Vice Chairperson of the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, at the Committee's 14th session in Geneva.

  24. Andrew Martel

    Early Career Academic

    Melbourne School of Design, FABP, UoM


    Overview


    Andrew is an Early Career Researcher whose research is focused on understanding the composition of value in housing. This has included developing methodologies to assess the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of dwellings in order to trace the impact of decisions made outside of the design sphere, such as financing, taxation, and regulation, on the final built outcome. His experience has included researching high-density student housing  (PhD thesis ‘Eco-Oikos: An investigation of value in high-density student housing in Melbourne, as part of the ARC Linkage Project 'Transnational and Temporary: Students, Community and Placemaking in Central Melbourne', LP0560639 2005-2009), remote Indigenous housing (ARC Linkage Project 'More Than a Roof Overhead: Meeting the Need for a Sustainable Housing System in Remote Indigenous Communities', LP0883615 2009-2012, and the NCCARF funded project 'Living Change: Adaptive Housing Responses to Climate Change in the Town Camps of Alice Springs', NCCARF ARGP Indigenous Communities IC-11-08, at RMIT University), and inner city affordable housing (with two Carlton Connect Initiative funded projects 'Getting to Yes: Overcoming Barriers to Affordable Family Friendly Housing in Central Melbourne' 2013-14, and 'Transforming Housing' 2014-15).


    DRI Projects

    Market forces or forcing markets

  25. Jesse Olsen

    Senior Research Fellow

    Centre for Workplace Leadership, FBE, UoM


    Overview


    Jesse Olsen earned his PhD in organisational behaviour from the Scheller College of Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, USA. His research focuses on diversity management and international/cross-cultural management. He has published his work in such outlets as the Journal of Applied Psychology , Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes , and the Journal of Organizational Behavior , and he is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Human Resource Management . Jesse has also presented his research at numerous academic and professional conferences, receiving best paper awards from the Academy of Management. Jesse's professional experience includes his position as international exchange coordinator at Kwansei Gakuin University in Nishinomiya, Japan. He was also employed as a business project manager in the Merger Integration Office and Corporate Strategies Group of SunTrust Bank in Atlanta. Before coming to The University of Melbourne, Jesse conducted research and taught courses in the US, South Korea, and Japan.


    DRI Projects

    Recruitment and retention of people with disability

  26. Marimuthu Palaniswami

    Fellow

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering, MSE, UoM


    Overview


    Prof. Marimuthu Palaniswami is a Fellow of the IEEE, and serves the community as a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society. He received the B.E. (Hons.) from the University of Madras, India; the M.E. degree from the Indian Institute of Science, India; the M.Eng.Sc. from the University of Melbourne, Australia and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Newcastle, Australia. He leads a large interdisciplinary research team in the areas of machine learning, sensor networks, signal processing, pattern recognition, biomedical engineering, control and telecommunications. He contributed significantly to the development of novel neural network and machine learning algorithms.


    DRI Projects

    Crowdsourcing of mobility hazards

  27. Michael Palmer

    Research Fellow

    Nossal Institute for Global Health, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Michael Palmer is a development economist specialising in the field of health. His research has focused on the economics of disability and policies for risk mitigation in low- and middle-income countries. His work aims to redress inequalities experienced by persons with disabilities and enhance social protection supports in low- and middle-income country settings. His main research work has been in Vietnam where he has lived and worked for four years, including positions at the University of Economics (Ho Chi Minh City) and the Hanoi School of Public Health. Michael obtained his PhD from the Australian National University in 2011.


    DRI Projects

    Disability and poverty in Cambodia

  28. Victoria Palmer

    Senior Research Fellow

    General Practice, Melbourne Medical School, UoM


    Overview


    Victoria’s expertise lies in interdisciplinary and translational research. She is trained in qualitative research methods and has a track record of publications in participatory action research, narrative analysis and visual methodologies. She has also built a trajectory of work in the application of ethical theory to develop responses to the problems of everyday primary medical care practice. She is the lead investigator of a world-first cluster randomised controlled trial to test if experience based co-design can improve psychosocial recovery outcomes for people affected by serious mental illnesses. Victoria’s research has examined the use of innovative methods to understand depression in primary care, including the use of photo elicitation within cross-cultural communities.


    DRI Projects

    Empathy and portrayals of mental illness in Australian visual culture

  29. Naomi Priest

    Senior Research Fellow

    Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, UoM


    Overview


    Naomi is a Senior Research Fellow in child public health and health inequalities and leader of the Anti-Racism and Diversity Studies Program, McCaughey Centre: VicHealth Centre for the Promotion of Mental Health and Community Wellbeing. Her current research is focused on addressing child health inequalities through combating racism and promoting diversity and inclusion. This includes social epidemiology and qualitative research to understand the effects of racism on child and youth health and wellbeing, as well as developing, implementing and evaluating anti-racism interventions with children and young people. Naomi also has a strong interest in evidence synthesis and knowledge translation and exchange, and has worked with the Cochrane Public Health Group on consultancies for Queensland Health, the WHO Global Commission for Social Determinants of Health and VicHealth. Naomi has also worked as an occupational therapist in a range of community settings with children and families from diverse backgrounds and as a lecturer and clinical supervisor in occupational therapy.


    DRI Projects

    Experiences of discrimination and bullying against Australians with disabilities

  30. Aravinda Rao

    Research Fellow

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering, MSE, UoM


    Overview


    Mr Aravinda S. Rao received the B.E. degree in electronics and communications engineering from Visveswaraya Technological University, India, in 2006, and the M.E. degree in electronics and telecommunications from Deakin University, Australia, in 2010. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree at the University of Melbourne, Australia, focusing on video-based crowd monitoring and behaviour analysis.  He was a Deputy Engineer in the Development and Engineering division of Naval Systems/Sonar Systems at Bharat Electronics Limited, Bengaluru, India, during 2006–2007. His research interests include computer vision, crowd behaviour analysis, manifold learning, wireless sensor networks, and embedded systems design.


    DRI Projects

    Crowdsourcing of mobility hazards

  31. Christine Sinclair

    Head of Drama Education

    Melbourne Graduate School of Education, UoM


    Overview


    Christine Sinclair is head of drama education at the University of Melbourne. She teaches and researches across a range of arts and drama education programs, from teacher education to community, youth arts and Shakespeare. She has been a lecturer in drama, arts education at the undergraduate and post-graduate level at a number of universities and has also coordinated postgraduate programs in professional and creative writing. She is also a freelance community artist, working as a writer and director in many community settings. Her research interests include community arts and cultural development; performed research and reflective practitioner research; and innovative and creative pedagogies. Christine was director of publications and editor of the internationally peer reviewed journal, Nj: the Journal for Drama Australia for several years, and was a co-editor and contributing author for Education in the Arts published by Oxford University Press.


    DRI Projects

    Women and disability: Stand-up comedy as a tool for advocacy

  32. Grace Thompson

    Lecturer and Researcher

    Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Grace Thompson is a registered music therapist, researcher and lecturer at The University of Melbourne.  Grace has worked as a music therapist and team leader in Early Childhood Intervention and Special Education and her research focuses on using music to support development and quality of life of children with disability within family-centred contexts. Grace is currently the President of the Australian Music Therapy Association and co-editor of the recently published book “Music Therapy with Families: Therapeutic Approaches and Theoretical Perspectives”.


    DRI Projects

    Optimising visual attention in children with autism spectrum disorder Project was funded through the MNI interdisciplinary seed funding 2016 round, supported by DRI

  33. Cathy Vaughan

    Senior Lecturer in Gender and Women's Health

    Centre for Health Equity, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Cathy Vaughan is a Senior Lecturer in Gender and Women’s Health in the Centre for Health Equity, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. She currently leads research projects working to improve the sexual and reproductive health of women with disability in the Philippines; and to strengthen community-led responses to violence against immigrant and refugee women in Victoria and Tasmania. She has previously led projects exploring the impact of female genital cutting on women and families in Victoria, and is currently involved in research into discriminatory acts against young people with disability; employment outcomes for people with disability; and media representations of violence against women. Cathy coordinates the WHO Collaborating Centre for Women’s Health hosted by the Centre for Health Equity, and teaches post-graduate courses on Community-Based Participatory Research; Gender and Health; and Women and Global Health. Prior to shifting to academia, Cathy was a global health and development practitioner in the areas of youth health, women’s health, HIV and disability. Since 1996 she has worked with community groups, NGOs and government departments to conduct social research and to design, implement and evaluate health programs in Cambodia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and a number of other countries in Asia, the Pacific, and sub-Saharan Africa.  This experience underpins her commitment to community-based and participatory approaches to research, research translation and community engagement.


    DRI Projects

    Listening for (a) change Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

    More than the sum of my parts

  34. Deborah Warr

    Research Fellow

    McCaughey Community Wellbeing Unit, UoM


    Overview


    Deborah is a VicHealth Research Fellow with the McCaughey Centre, and her work is primarily aimed at understanding socio-economic contexts for health inequalities in developed nations. With degrees from Deakin, Monash, and LaTrobe universities, her academic association with the University of Melbourne spans her time as an NHMRC post-doctoral research fellow with the School of Population Health's Centre for Health and Society, and in a variety of other lecturing and teaching roles as a sociologist in the Faculties of Arts and Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. Deborah has published widely and is recognised internationally for work that includes reports of empirical findings and articles exploring theoretical and methodological issues. She has long-standing commitment and expertise in collaborative, participatory and community based research methods and ensuring that the findings of research are accessible for implementation in policy and practice.


    DRI Projects

    Choice, control and the NDIS

    Listening for (a) change Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

    More than the sum of my parts

  35. Georgia Warren-Myers

    Lecturer in Property

    Melbourne School of Design, UoM


    Overview


    Georgia’s career has been an ongoing integration of industry practice and academia. This approach has led to the development of her research qualities and capabilities in addition to her perspectives from industry, which has informed her research and provided new and innovative contributions to practice and academia. In academia Georgia has developed experience in research project inception; research design; qualitative and quantitative research methods and analysis techniques; and dissemination techniques comprising report writing, journal submissions and presentations for industry, government and academia. She has interdisciplinary skills in property, valuation, construction, sustainability and planning which has enabled her to collaborate with a broad spectrum of academic researchers and industry professionals. Georgia’s professional experience as a property valuer and graduate development manager with a major residential developer provide her with a unique background that can inform the research, and her academic background and skills will enable a thorough and focused investigation into stakeholder perceptions, values and willingness-to-pay. In particular, Georgia’s PhD investigated the value of sustainability and examined multiple stakeholders’ perceptions, decisions and actions in the commercial sector; whilst a significant collaborative research project with Sustainability Victoria examined homeowners’ perspectives, values and implementation of sustainability in the renovation of their homes.


    DRI Projects

    Market forces or forcing markets

  36. Anthony White

    Senior Lecturer

    School of Culture and Communication, Arts, UoM


    Overview


    Anthony is a leading international expert on modern art, with a distinguished reputation for his work on the social implications of how art by people with mental illness is interpreted. He co-curated the exhibition The Art of Making Sense (2008) at the Cunningham Dax Collection, supported by an ARC Linkage Project Grant, Framing Marginal Art on which he was Chief Investigator in partnership with the Cunningham Dax Collection, Museum Victoria and The Mental Health Foundation. In 2014, Anthony was asked by Arts Project Australia (the leading national disability arts organisation in Australia) to convene their 40th Anniversary conference in partnership with the University of Melbourne. This conference Contemporary Outsider Art: The Global Context focused on contemporary debates in the field of Outsider art and social inclusion, and involved historians, artists and curators.


    DRI Projects

    Empathy and portrayals of mental illness in Australian visual culture

  37. Marcus White

    Senior Lecturer

    Digital Design in Architecture, Melbourne School of Design, UoM


    Overview


    Dr Marcus White is an award winning architect and urban designer, co-director of Harrison and White Pty Ltd and senior lecturer in architecture and urban design at the University of Melbourne. He has been the recipient of numerous design awards including the RAIA Haddon Travelling Scholarship, the AIA Victorian Emerging Architect Award, the inaugural AIA National Emerging Architect Award, an AIA residential architecture award and was recently awarded the Graham Treloar Fellowship for his urban design modelling research.


    DRI Projects

    Topographical community accessibility modelling for people with mobility impairment

  38. Ruth Williams

    Academic Convenor

    Hallmark Ageing Research Initiative, MSPGH, UoM


    Overview


    Ruth Williams is the Academic Convenor of the Hallmark Ageing Research Initiative in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. She is also a Research Fellow with the Centre for Workplace Leadership at the University of Melbourne. Ruth’s research on social gerontology focuses on the relationship between age and the labour market. She has project managed research exploring the experiences, meaning and importance of older worker’s work-life transitions, employer attitudes, workplace policy, the relationship between health and employment, and caregiving and labour force participation. She has also worked in collaboration with a number of industry partners and organisational case studies from domestic and international government, university and private sectors to identify and implement strategies to maximise the benefits of an ageing workforce. Ruth is the author of the Age Management Toolkit for Employers and has previously worked as a Research Fellow at the National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre and in the Faculty of Business and Economics at Monash University.

    DRI Projects

    Recruitment and retention of people with disability

  39. Elaine Wong

    ARC Future Fellow

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering, MSE, UoM


    Overview


    Elaine Wong received the Ph.D. degree in electrical and electronic engineering from The University of Melbourne, in December 2002. Since then, she has worked at the University of Melbourne, Australia, the University of California, Berkeley, USA, and Google, Inc. USA. She is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Melbourne. Elaine is also an Australia Research Council (ARC) funded Future Fellow. Her research interests include optical-wireless convergence, multiple access communication protocols, energy-efficient optical and wireless networks, network protection and survivability, and healthy ageing. She has authored and co-authored more than 160 technical articles in these areas. She is a Senior Member of the IEEE and Member of the OSA. She is currently serving on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Lightwave Technology. She was an Associate Editor for the IEEE/OSA Journal of Optical Communications and Networking from 2009–2012.


    DRI Projects

    Crowdsourcing of mobility hazards

External Researchers (4)

  1. Jasmin Chen

    Researcher and Executive Assistant

    Multicultural Centre for Women's Health


    Overview


    DRI Projects

    Listening for (a) change Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

  2. Lucy Ledger

    Technical Advisor in Disability Inclusive Development

    CBM Australia


    Overview


    Lucy's background is as an Occupational Therapist working in community based disability services with Indigenous populations in Australia. Following this Lucy worked in Bangladesh for two years for World Vision and UNICEF advising on disability inclusion within development programming. Lucy currently works for CBM Australia as a Technical Advisor in Disability Inclusive Development and is studying the Graduate Diploma of Human Rights Law at the University of Melbourne.

  3. Regina Quiazon

    Senior Research and Policy Advocate

    Multicultural Centre for Women's Health


    Overview


    DRI Projects

    Listening for (a) change Project co-funded by DRI through the 2016 MAEVe seed-funding round

  4. Erin Wilson

    Associate Professor of Disability and Inclusion

    School of Health & Social Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University


    Overview